children

  • Top 5 Equipment Recommendations for Parents of Young Children

    As an occupational therapist with close to 20 years of experience working with parents of young children, I often get […]

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  • S.U.P.E.R. Hero Discipline

    Disciplining young
    children can be a frustrating experience. Many parents feel like they are doing
    it wrong and seek help and suggestions. My experience as a therapist has led me
    to create a simple way to remember key elements to help parents have a positive
    and more productive experience when disciplining their children.

    It is critical that
    discipline is presented in a way that allows both the child and the parent to
    be successful. Below I have listed 5 essential components required. The acronym
    SUPER is used to simplify this concept. It is also how I hope you will feel
    when you achieve the results you are seeking, like a super hero!

    S is for Supported holistically. Your body, mind, and soul
    must support any regulation that you set. This means you must be able to follow
    through physically, meet any expectation in relation to time, and be in
    agreement with whatever you state you will implement. For example, if you say
    to your child that you will take away their iPad for a week, you should stick
    with the week timeframe you stipulated. 

    U is for Understood by child. The child must understand
    what the disciplinary action is. If the child doesn’t understand, you are
    setting your child up to fail. It helps to ask your child to repeat back to you
    what you say so that you know your child was aware of your demand and the
    consequence.

    P is for Presented in advance. The disciplinary action
    should be presented in advance when possible. If you have a conversation with
    your child before a situation arises, the child will understand the expectation
    and aftermath before acting. For example, before going to a store, you can say
    that you expect good behavior or the privilege to go the next time will be
    lost.

    E is for Executed consistently. The most important part of
    discipline is honoring what you say. Children respond well when they sense
    consistency. If you execute authority consistently, a child will respect that
    you are sincere and can expect the consequence for his or her action.

    R is for Related to behavior. Discipline should be related
    to the behavior. If you attach penalties that have nothing to do with what the
    child is doing or not doing, it will not make sense to the child and will be
    more difficult for you to execute. For example, you should not threaten to
    prevent your child from attending a party if the party is not related to your
    request.

    I hope you find these
    tips helpful. If you have difficulty controlling the behavior of your child and
    need professional help, consider consulting with a behavioral or occupational
    therapist. Have a playful day!

    Amy Baez, OTR/L, The Smart Play
    Curator

    Amy Baez is a pediatric occupational
    therapist, award-winning handwriting author, and founder of Playapy. For more
    information about Playapy services and products, visit
    www.playapy.com or email info@playapy.com.

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  • Yoga Benefits for Youngins

    In recent decades
    yoga has become increasingly more mainstream as a form of exercise. Most
    fitness centers offer a variety of classes, and more often parents are allowing
    their children to participate with them. It may seem strange to think a child
    would have the discipline to attend or enjoy an adult class, but many young children
    are being exposed at a early age to yoga in schools that understand and value
    the benefits.

    As a pediatric
    occupational therapist, I have been incorporating elements of yoga with my
    young patients for years to help with skills such as concentration, coordination,
    flexibility, strengthening, self-control, balance, relaxation, and body
    awareness. Since many yoga poses have corresponding animal names, I find it
    easy to get children to imitate poses and engage in challenging poses for
    extended periods of time. The increased use of muscles not typically practiced
    in traditional play allow a child to benefit physically as well as the mental
    health boost that comes with stress relief and increased confidence.

    Some common yoga
    postures with animal names include: cat, cow, down dog, and dolphin.  These and many others are easy to search
    on-line and can be completed separately or in a sequence. Although it is
    important to practice intensive yoga with a trained instructor, parents can
    easily incorporate simple poses into play without much worry. For assistance in
    learning more, many product brands also sell flash cards that are created
    specifically for use with children including YogaCards by Think Fun and
    Yogarilla by Super Duper Publications.

    I hope you find
    this insightful. If your youngin struggles with coordination skills, balance,
    strength, or flexibility that has negatively affected other skill areas, consider
    consulting with an occupational therapist to develop a plan for your child.
    Have a playful day!

    Amy Baez, OTR/L, The Smart Play
    Curator

    Amy Baez is a pediatric occupational
    therapist, award-winning handwriting author, and founder of Playapy. For more
    information about Playapy services and products, visit
    www.playapy.com or email info@playapy.com.

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  • Does Your Child Have (Sensory) Issues?

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    As the number of
    children diagnosed in the United States increases each year, so does the
    public’s awareness of autism and its symptoms. Sensory processing problems,
    also referred to as “sensory issues,” are one of the most common symptoms of
    autism. They, however, can be experienced in children without the other
    criteria required for an autism diagnosis, which include communication
    difficulties, social challenges, and repetitive behaviors.

    Sensory
    processing is defined as the way the nervous system receives information from
    the senses and interprets it into motor and behavioral responses. Sensory
    issues occur when the body has a response that is considered to be outside of
    the normal range. For example, a child may be overly sensitive to light and may
    not be able to tolerate brightly lit supermarket. This may cause the child to
    act out or have “issues.” When a child has responses that seriously affect or
    interfere with everyday life, a diagnosis such as Sensory Processing Disorder may
    be given.

    Everybody knows the
    five senses of sight, smell, sound, taste, and touch. Yet, sensory input also
    can be received from the sense of balance and spatial orientation in movement
    (vestibular sense) and the sense of position and strength needed in movement
    (proprioceptive sense). When a child is hyper-responsive, that means he or she
    demonstrates a low or hyposensitivity. When a child is hypo-responsive, that
    means he or she demonstrates a high or hypersensitivity.

    Examples of hyposensitivity
    include:

    Touches people or things excessively or when
    not appropriate

    Craves movement and/or has difficulty
    remaining still

    May harm others by not recognizing his or
    her own strength

    Does not respond to requests or name being
    called

    Examples of hypersensitivity
    include:

    Easily distracted or annoyed by background
    noises

    Avoids or is fearful of playground
    equipment like swings or monkey bars

    Walks on tiptoes or is hesitant to walk on
    sand or grass

    Very particular about clothing or food textures

    Occupational
    therapists (OTs) specialize in helping children regulate the sensory system
    through sensory integration therapy. If your child has disruptive sensory
    issues, consider consulting with your pediatrician about prescribing an evaluation
    with an OT who can create and implement a plan specific to your child. I hope
    you find this information helpful. Have a playful day!

    Amy Baez, OTR/L, The Smart Play
    Curator

    Amy Baez is a pediatric occupational
    therapist, award-winning handwriting author, and founder of Playapy. For more
    information about Playapy services and products, visit
    www.playapy.com or email info@playapy.com.

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  • A Passion for Play

    February is the
    time of year for professing your true love, and I am not too shy to admit that
    one of my greatest passions is play. As a pediatric occupational therapist, I
    spend many hours of my week at play with children. The trunk of my car is full
    of games, toys, and equipment like balls and cushions. I design activities to
    foster skills in children that have developmental delays or disorders that make
    learning and living more challenging for them. Surprisingly, I often have to remind
    parents and teachers that play is actually a child’s occupation. It is through
    play that they learn, use their imaginations, problem solve, enhance their
    muscular coordination and strength, regulate their emotions, and develop their
    sensory systems to understand the world around them. 

    My passion for
    play is a direct result of witnessing the negative effects of schools
    decreasing recess time for young children. Hence, I have become an advocate for
    more playtime in schools. In recent years, societies have moved away from play
    by placing more concern on risk aversion, separating from nature, and
    succumbing to elements of modern living like increased technology. In addition,
    the implementation of policies like No
    Child Left Behind
    has placed more emphasis on testing and assessment
    scores. This has forced schools to find more time in the day for instruction,
    which has led to reducing unstructured play opportunities and free time for
    children. Research, however, shows unfortunate consequences have developed from
    trying to improve education in this way. In fact Boston University psychologist
    and author, Peter Gray, has studied the link between a sharp rise in mental
    disorders and the decline of free play over the last 50 years.

    As more therapists and educators
    become passionate about play advocacy, more attention is brought to this
    important issue. Subsequently there are more positive stories in the
    news including a 1st grade teacher in Texas who recently
    experimented with adding more recess time during the day. Over the course of
    five months, she reported her students were more focused, more attentive, less
    fidgety, and less likely to have discipline issues. I can only hope that more
    schools rethink their recess policies and return to providing more time for
    students to rest and reset their minds.

    I hope you find
    this insightful. If your child struggles with a lack of play opportunities in
    school, consider consulting with an occupational therapist to develop a plan
    for your home. Have a playful day!

    Amy Baez, OTR/L, The Smart Play
    Curator

    Amy Baez is a pediatric occupational
    therapist, award-winning handwriting author, and founder of Playapy. For more
    information about Playapy services and products, visit
    www.playapy.com or email info@playapy.com.

    Continue reading
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