discipline

  • S.U.P.E.R. Hero Discipline

    Disciplining young
    children can be a frustrating experience. Many parents feel like they are doing
    it wrong and seek help and suggestions. My experience as a therapist has led me
    to create a simple way to remember key elements to help parents have a positive
    and more productive experience when disciplining their children.

    It is critical that
    discipline is presented in a way that allows both the child and the parent to
    be successful. Below I have listed 5 essential components required. The acronym
    SUPER is used to simplify this concept. It is also how I hope you will feel
    when you achieve the results you are seeking, like a super hero!

    S is for Supported holistically. Your body, mind, and soul
    must support any regulation that you set. This means you must be able to follow
    through physically, meet any expectation in relation to time, and be in
    agreement with whatever you state you will implement. For example, if you say
    to your child that you will take away their iPad for a week, you should stick
    with the week timeframe you stipulated. 

    U is for Understood by child. The child must understand
    what the disciplinary action is. If the child doesn’t understand, you are
    setting your child up to fail. It helps to ask your child to repeat back to you
    what you say so that you know your child was aware of your demand and the
    consequence.

    P is for Presented in advance. The disciplinary action
    should be presented in advance when possible. If you have a conversation with
    your child before a situation arises, the child will understand the expectation
    and aftermath before acting. For example, before going to a store, you can say
    that you expect good behavior or the privilege to go the next time will be
    lost.

    E is for Executed consistently. The most important part of
    discipline is honoring what you say. Children respond well when they sense
    consistency. If you execute authority consistently, a child will respect that
    you are sincere and can expect the consequence for his or her action.

    R is for Related to behavior. Discipline should be related
    to the behavior. If you attach penalties that have nothing to do with what the
    child is doing or not doing, it will not make sense to the child and will be
    more difficult for you to execute. For example, you should not threaten to
    prevent your child from attending a party if the party is not related to your
    request.

    I hope you find these
    tips helpful. If you have difficulty controlling the behavior of your child and
    need professional help, consider consulting with a behavioral or occupational
    therapist. Have a playful day!

    Amy Baez, OTR/L, The Smart Play
    Curator

    Amy Baez is a pediatric occupational
    therapist, award-winning handwriting author, and founder of Playapy. For more
    information about Playapy services and products, visit
    www.playapy.com or email info@playapy.com.

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  • From Zoo to Zen

    As schools put more pressure on young
    students to read and write at earlier ages, children are fighting a battle to
    maintain a lifestyle of learning through play. The preschool years are now
    cutting back on the playtime necessary to develop the sensory and motor skills
    needed prior to instructing skills like handwriting. In addition the increase
    in use of technology is changing culture and creating norms that are deterring
    adequate social skills needed for engaging human interaction and motor skills
    needed for fine motor and daily living tasks. This is having psychosocial
    consequences on children leading to a generation of children that do not enjoy
    learning nor have adequate attention spans to absorb what they are learning.
    Their brains can be compared to a zoo full of monkeys swinging from one idea to
    the next without the skills needed to rest the mind.

    With
    each passing day, the practice of mindfulness is finding its way into daily
    conversation and advice columns. It seems like everyone from comics to
    corporate CEOs are finding ways to zone in on Zen practices to clear the mind,
    escape technology addictions, and find new ways to connect with humans. The
    idea of mindfulness, the state of being aware of the present moment, may sound
    sophisticated, but research now suggests it should make its way into classroom
    curriculum.  In fact, actress Goldie Hawn
    is the founder of a mindfulness classroom curriculum called MindUPTM.
    Its proven benefits include increased optimism and self-concept,
    improved academic achievement, increased planning and organizational skills,
    and increased empathy and other pro-social skills.  

    Here are some simple mindfulness
    activities that I practice with children to foster these skills at an early
    age.

    Body Awareness- Practice squeezing individual body parts upon request while lying on floor face up with eyes closed. Recall which body parts were squeezed at the end of the exercise.

    Breathing Bundy- Practice breathing
    while lying down with a stuffed animal resting on the tummy. Watch the animal
    rise and fall with each inhale and exhale.

    Blind Touch- Practice holding and feeling an unknown object with eye closed. Determine its qualities through the use of the sense of touch.

    I hope you find these tips helpful.
    If you child has difficulty focusing despite practicing mindfulness activities,
    consider consulting with an occupational therapist for additional strategies. To
    learn more about MindUPTM and its research findings, check out the
    TheHawnFoundation.org.

    Amy Baez, OTR/L, The Smart Play
    Curator

    Amy Baez is a pediatric occupational
    therapist, award-winning handwriting author, and founder of Playapy. For more
    information about Playapy services and products, visit
    www.playapy.com or email info@playapy.com.

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  • Does Your Child Have (Sensory) Issues?

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    As the number of
    children diagnosed in the United States increases each year, so does the
    public’s awareness of autism and its symptoms. Sensory processing problems,
    also referred to as “sensory issues,” are one of the most common symptoms of
    autism. They, however, can be experienced in children without the other
    criteria required for an autism diagnosis, which include communication
    difficulties, social challenges, and repetitive behaviors.

    Sensory
    processing is defined as the way the nervous system receives information from
    the senses and interprets it into motor and behavioral responses. Sensory
    issues occur when the body has a response that is considered to be outside of
    the normal range. For example, a child may be overly sensitive to light and may
    not be able to tolerate brightly lit supermarket. This may cause the child to
    act out or have “issues.” When a child has responses that seriously affect or
    interfere with everyday life, a diagnosis such as Sensory Processing Disorder may
    be given.

    Everybody knows the
    five senses of sight, smell, sound, taste, and touch. Yet, sensory input also
    can be received from the sense of balance and spatial orientation in movement
    (vestibular sense) and the sense of position and strength needed in movement
    (proprioceptive sense). When a child is hyper-responsive, that means he or she
    demonstrates a low or hyposensitivity. When a child is hypo-responsive, that
    means he or she demonstrates a high or hypersensitivity.

    Examples of hyposensitivity
    include:

    Touches people or things excessively or when
    not appropriate

    Craves movement and/or has difficulty
    remaining still

    May harm others by not recognizing his or
    her own strength

    Does not respond to requests or name being
    called

    Examples of hypersensitivity
    include:

    Easily distracted or annoyed by background
    noises

    Avoids or is fearful of playground
    equipment like swings or monkey bars

    Walks on tiptoes or is hesitant to walk on
    sand or grass

    Very particular about clothing or food textures

    Occupational
    therapists (OTs) specialize in helping children regulate the sensory system
    through sensory integration therapy. If your child has disruptive sensory
    issues, consider consulting with your pediatrician about prescribing an evaluation
    with an OT who can create and implement a plan specific to your child. I hope
    you find this information helpful. Have a playful day!

    Amy Baez, OTR/L, The Smart Play
    Curator

    Amy Baez is a pediatric occupational
    therapist, award-winning handwriting author, and founder of Playapy. For more
    information about Playapy services and products, visit
    www.playapy.com or email info@playapy.com.

    Continue reading
  • Good Night, Sleep Right!

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    The phrase “sleep
    like a baby” seems like an oxymoron to most parents of newborns. Yet many
    people are not aware of how often sleep disturbances affect the home life for
    parents of children much older as well. With National Sleep Awareness Week
    taking place March 6-13th, I would like to shed some light on the
    issue of sleep concerns related to children. Sleep issues can cause a host of
    problems for children involving their mood, behavior, memory, concentration,
    safety, and reaction time. Hence, not only can home life be disrupted but
    school as well. 

    Signs of sleep
    problems that should be brought to a doctor’s attention include:

    Snoring or irregular breathing while
    sleeping

    Difficulty falling or staying asleep

    Difficulty staying awake during the day

    Unusual nightmares or sleep walking

    Unexplained poor performance during
    waking hours

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    Parents can help
    their child in many ways. Here are some commonly known and smart suggestions:

    Establish a regular and consistent bed
    time and stick to it.

    Create a relaxing routine that is similar
    to a spa experience.

    Adjust the lighting, noise level, and
    temperature of the room for comfort.

    Turn and keep off electronics an hour
    before bedtime.

    Avoid caffeine six hours before sleeping
    and big meals close to bedtime.

    Put your child to bed before falling asleep
    and don’t get into the bed.

    I hope you find
    these tips helpful. If your child regularly struggles with sleep, consider
    consulting with your pediatrician or an occupational therapist to develop a
    plan for your home specific to your child. There are many alternative options
    including sleep apps, specialty pillows, and books that may be worth the cost
    if you can gain sleep for you and your child. Have a playful day!

    Amy Baez, OTR/L, The Smart Play
    Curator

    Amy Baez is a pediatric occupational
    therapist, award-winning handwriting author, and founder of Playapy. For more
    information about Playapy services and products, visit
    www.playapy.com or email info@playapy.com.

    Continue reading
  • Turn Tantrums into Tame Behavior

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    It’s summer, and it’s no big
    surprise that tempers can rise just as easily as the temperature when children
    are hot, tired, and exhausted from the heat. Parents can find themselves in
    situations when they feel their blood boiling as well. So it helps to be
    mentally prepared for those special moments when your child tests your tolerance.
    As a therapist, I have worked with hundreds of children, and I have found that
    5 main strategies are most effective when I need to turn a tantrum moment into
    something more tolerable. Here are my suggestions:

    #1 Ignore it. It is
    often best to not draw attention to negative behaviors. For example, if a child
    throws a toy, continue the current task but also make sure that the child picks
    up the toy later. If the child is abusive, you may need to restrain them for a
    few seconds to prevent any harm, but resist lecturing in the moment.

    #2 Change the scene.
    Sometimes, drawing attention to something else will distract a child enough to
    create a shift in their emotional state. This can include changing locations,
    suggesting another option, or introducing something novel like a new phone app
    they haven’t seen. Keep in mind, using technology as a strategy is not advised for extended periods of time.

    #3 Keep calm. If you
    raise your voice and heighten your stress level, the child’s behavior may
    escalate to match yours. Remember to use a soft voice, breathe slowly, and if
    possible offer your child a firm hug to give them a sense of security.

    #4 Find the source…and
    remove it. Just like adults, children want to be understood. Try to get your
    child to communicate what is causing them stress. Removing the person or object
    temporarily can decrease the tension momentarily.

    #5 Provide incentives.
    Call it bribery or creative strategizing or motivation, but children will do
    amazing and challenging things for a “treat” they find valuable. The trick is
    to determine if it’s a sticker, free play, food, rest, toys, money, quality
    time, or something else. Figure out what motivates them, and follow through
    with the delivery of it but only if its not what has caused the tantrum.

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    I hope you find these tips helpful. If your child consistently has tantrums you are unable to tame, consider consulting with your pediatrician about the possible need of occupational therapy services. Have a playful day!

    Amy Baez, OTR/L, The Smart Play Curator

    Amy Baez is a pediatric occupational therapist,
    award-winning handwriting author, and founder of Playapy. For more information
    about Playapy services and products, visit
    www.playapy.com
    or email
    info@playapy.com.

    Continue reading