Toddlers

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  • Is Your Child Ready to Write? Part 2

    Last week, Part 1 of Is Your Child Ready to Write? provided a brief description of six essentials skills needed […]

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  • Potty Training: A Fun and Fast Way

    Since the invention of the disposable diaper in the 1940’s, parents have both struggled with and enjoyed the benefits of […]

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  • Tummy Time Never Gets Old- BLOG HOP REPOST

    Tummy Time Never Gets Old- BLOG HOP REPOST:

    playapyplatform:

    Most parents of very young children are aware that their child needs “Tummy Time.” They usually make great attempts at getting their baby’s tummy down on a mat and even will get down on the same level to increase the time their baby will remain happy. In my therapeutic experience, most parents do…

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  • April is Autism Awareness Month

    Recent reported estimates in the news have stated as many as 1 in every 68 children in the United States has autism, a developmental disorder that appears in the first 3 years of life, and affects the brain’s normal development of social and communication skills.  The numbers and methods of obtaining these new estimates are subject to debate, but what is clear is that the increase in cases in going up and up year after year.  Some of this is attributed to the increase in awareness of symptoms, which may be leading to inaccurate diagnosing from parents and doctors.  However, the increase in awareness can also help to get children services needed to improve developmental skills despite having the correct diagnosis.   There are screenings available that include checklists to help in this process.  The Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers, Revised with Follow-Up is a 2-stage parent-report screening tool to assess risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The M-CHAT-R/F is an autism screening tool designed to identify children 16 to 30 months of age who should receive a more thorough assessment for possible early signs of ASD or developmental delay.  The M-CHAT-R/F is intended to be administered by a trained health care professional, so if you answer the questions at home, please discuss your results with your doctor regardless of the results.  You can view and complete the checklist at no cost on www.m-chat.org.  

    If your child is having difficulty with language and social skills or play, learning, and self-care skills, you should consult with your doctor about having a speech therapist or occupational therapist conduct an evaluation and create a treatment plan if deemed necessary.  Have a playful day!

    Amy Baez, OTR/L, The Smart Play Curator

    Amy Baez is a pediatric occupational therapist, award-winning handwriting author, and founder of Playapy. For more information, visit www.playapy.com or email info@playapy.com.

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  • Safe & Edible Toys for Tots

    When new parents start to purchase toys, the importance of safety starts to really set in mostly because of choking hazards.  It is common to see warnings on toys that have small parts because typically children under three years old and especially babies are not able to differentiate between edible and inedible objects.  Small children like to mouth objects as a normal part of their exploration and play skills.  This is how they learn and understand concepts like size and textures.  So as parents, you need to be careful and aware of what comes in the reach of a small child.  You also don’t want to completely avoid exposing your children to small things because they also need to develop hand skills for grasping objects and coordinating the use of both hands. 

    Here are some simple activities to practice with a toddler to encourage sensory and fine motor play:

    1. Picking up and holding pieces of dried fruit like apricots.
    2. Sliding chopsticks through strawberries.
    3. Picking out marshmallows from a container of dry pasta spirals.
    4. Stringing cheerios onto a pipe cleaner.
    5. Putting crackers into a small open jar or bottle. 

    Remember to consult with your pediatrician if your child continues to try to eat or mouth inedible objects after age three.  Have a playful day!

    Amy Baez, OTR/L, The Smart Play Curator

    Amy Baez is a pediatric occupational therapist, award-winning author, and founder of Playapy. For more information, visit www.playapy.com or email info@playapy.com.

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