Behavioral Skills

Collection of predefined components to use on your site
  • What is Authoritative Parenting?

    Every child experiences a particular parenting style, but authoritative parenting is what is most recommended. So what is it, and […]

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  • S.U.P.E.R. Hero Discipline

    Disciplining young
    children can be a frustrating experience. Many parents feel like they are doing
    it wrong and seek help and suggestions. My experience as a therapist has led me
    to create a simple way to remember key elements to help parents have a positive
    and more productive experience when disciplining their children.

    It is critical that
    discipline is presented in a way that allows both the child and the parent to
    be successful. Below I have listed 5 essential components required. The acronym
    SUPER is used to simplify this concept. It is also how I hope you will feel
    when you achieve the results you are seeking, like a super hero!

    S is for Supported holistically. Your body, mind, and soul
    must support any regulation that you set. This means you must be able to follow
    through physically, meet any expectation in relation to time, and be in
    agreement with whatever you state you will implement. For example, if you say
    to your child that you will take away their iPad for a week, you should stick
    with the week timeframe you stipulated. 

    U is for Understood by child. The child must understand
    what the disciplinary action is. If the child doesn’t understand, you are
    setting your child up to fail. It helps to ask your child to repeat back to you
    what you say so that you know your child was aware of your demand and the
    consequence.

    P is for Presented in advance. The disciplinary action
    should be presented in advance when possible. If you have a conversation with
    your child before a situation arises, the child will understand the expectation
    and aftermath before acting. For example, before going to a store, you can say
    that you expect good behavior or the privilege to go the next time will be
    lost.

    E is for Executed consistently. The most important part of
    discipline is honoring what you say. Children respond well when they sense
    consistency. If you execute authority consistently, a child will respect that
    you are sincere and can expect the consequence for his or her action.

    R is for Related to behavior. Discipline should be related
    to the behavior. If you attach penalties that have nothing to do with what the
    child is doing or not doing, it will not make sense to the child and will be
    more difficult for you to execute. For example, you should not threaten to
    prevent your child from attending a party if the party is not related to your
    request.

    I hope you find these
    tips helpful. If you have difficulty controlling the behavior of your child and
    need professional help, consider consulting with a behavioral or occupational
    therapist. Have a playful day!

    Amy Baez, OTR/L, The Smart Play
    Curator

    Amy Baez is a pediatric occupational
    therapist, award-winning handwriting author, and founder of Playapy. For more
    information about Playapy services and products, visit
    www.playapy.com or email info@playapy.com.

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  • From Zoo to Zen

    As schools put more pressure on young
    students to read and write at earlier ages, children are fighting a battle to
    maintain a lifestyle of learning through play. The preschool years are now
    cutting back on the playtime necessary to develop the sensory and motor skills
    needed prior to instructing skills like handwriting. In addition the increase
    in use of technology is changing culture and creating norms that are deterring
    adequate social skills needed for engaging human interaction and motor skills
    needed for fine motor and daily living tasks. This is having psychosocial
    consequences on children leading to a generation of children that do not enjoy
    learning nor have adequate attention spans to absorb what they are learning.
    Their brains can be compared to a zoo full of monkeys swinging from one idea to
    the next without the skills needed to rest the mind.

    With
    each passing day, the practice of mindfulness is finding its way into daily
    conversation and advice columns. It seems like everyone from comics to
    corporate CEOs are finding ways to zone in on Zen practices to clear the mind,
    escape technology addictions, and find new ways to connect with humans. The
    idea of mindfulness, the state of being aware of the present moment, may sound
    sophisticated, but research now suggests it should make its way into classroom
    curriculum.  In fact, actress Goldie Hawn
    is the founder of a mindfulness classroom curriculum called MindUPTM.
    Its proven benefits include increased optimism and self-concept,
    improved academic achievement, increased planning and organizational skills,
    and increased empathy and other pro-social skills.  

    Here are some simple mindfulness
    activities that I practice with children to foster these skills at an early
    age.

    Body Awareness- Practice squeezing individual body parts upon request while lying on floor face up with eyes closed. Recall which body parts were squeezed at the end of the exercise.

    Breathing Bundy- Practice breathing
    while lying down with a stuffed animal resting on the tummy. Watch the animal
    rise and fall with each inhale and exhale.

    Blind Touch- Practice holding and feeling an unknown object with eye closed. Determine its qualities through the use of the sense of touch.

    I hope you find these tips helpful.
    If you child has difficulty focusing despite practicing mindfulness activities,
    consider consulting with an occupational therapist for additional strategies. To
    learn more about MindUPTM and its research findings, check out the
    TheHawnFoundation.org.

    Amy Baez, OTR/L, The Smart Play
    Curator

    Amy Baez is a pediatric occupational
    therapist, award-winning handwriting author, and founder of Playapy. For more
    information about Playapy services and products, visit
    www.playapy.com or email info@playapy.com.

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  • Yoga Benefits for Youngins

    In recent decades
    yoga has become increasingly more mainstream as a form of exercise. Most
    fitness centers offer a variety of classes, and more often parents are allowing
    their children to participate with them. It may seem strange to think a child
    would have the discipline to attend or enjoy an adult class, but many young children
    are being exposed at a early age to yoga in schools that understand and value
    the benefits.

    As a pediatric
    occupational therapist, I have been incorporating elements of yoga with my
    young patients for years to help with skills such as concentration, coordination,
    flexibility, strengthening, self-control, balance, relaxation, and body
    awareness. Since many yoga poses have corresponding animal names, I find it
    easy to get children to imitate poses and engage in challenging poses for
    extended periods of time. The increased use of muscles not typically practiced
    in traditional play allow a child to benefit physically as well as the mental
    health boost that comes with stress relief and increased confidence.

    Some common yoga
    postures with animal names include: cat, cow, down dog, and dolphin.  These and many others are easy to search
    on-line and can be completed separately or in a sequence. Although it is
    important to practice intensive yoga with a trained instructor, parents can
    easily incorporate simple poses into play without much worry. For assistance in
    learning more, many product brands also sell flash cards that are created
    specifically for use with children including YogaCards by Think Fun and
    Yogarilla by Super Duper Publications.

    I hope you find
    this insightful. If your youngin struggles with coordination skills, balance,
    strength, or flexibility that has negatively affected other skill areas, consider
    consulting with an occupational therapist to develop a plan for your child.
    Have a playful day!

    Amy Baez, OTR/L, The Smart Play
    Curator

    Amy Baez is a pediatric occupational
    therapist, award-winning handwriting author, and founder of Playapy. For more
    information about Playapy services and products, visit
    www.playapy.com or email info@playapy.com.

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  • April is Autism Awareness Month

    playapyplatform:

    Recent reported estimates in the news have stated as many as 1 in every 68 children in the United States has autism, a developmental disorder that appears in the first 3 years of life, and affects the brain’s normal development of social and communication skills.  The numbers and methods of obtaining these new estimates are subject to debate, but what is clear is that the increase in cases in going up and up year after year.  Some of this is attributed to the increase in awareness of symptoms, which may be leading to inaccurate diagnosing from parents and doctors.  However, the increase in awareness can also help to get children services needed to improve developmental skills despite having the correct diagnosis.   There are screenings available that include checklists to help in this process.  The Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers, Revised with Follow-Up is a 2-stage parent-report screening tool to assess risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The M-CHAT-R/F is an autism screening tool designed to identify children 16 to 30 months of age who should receive a more thorough assessment for possible early signs of ASD or developmental delay.  The M-CHAT-R/F is intended to be administered by a trained health care professional, so if you answer the questions at home, please discuss your results with your doctor regardless of the results.  You can view and complete the checklist at no cost on www.m-chat.org.  

    If your child is having difficulty with language and social skills or play, learning, and self-care skills, you should consult with your doctor about having a speech therapist or occupational therapist conduct an evaluation and create a treatment plan if deemed necessary.  Have a playful day!

    Amy Baez, OTR/L, The Smart Play Curator

    Amy Baez is a pediatric occupational therapist, award-winning handwriting author, and founder of Playapy. For more information, visit www.playapy.com or email info@playapy.com.

    Celebrating Autism Awareness Month with a reblog of this 2014 blog post. 

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